Josh Martin

Change the Taste of Your Food?
Change the Taste of Your Food?

You know that phrase, “There’s an App for that.” It really is becoming true for EVERYTHING! Like, “Want to change the taste of the food you’re eating? There’s an app for that”…..really! A new app claims to be able to change the taste of food with a mini air-freshener cartridge, there dubbing The Scentee, that plugs into your Smartphone’s headphone port. The app can be set to release a scent when your phone’s alarm clock goes off or when you receive a text message. They offer floral scents like lavender and jasmine, as well as food scents ranging from strawberries and coffee to curry and bacon. The Scentee is currently being sold in Japan for about $35. The App claims to change the taste of food because smell plays major part in tasting food. Do we really need air fresheners attached to our phone? I’m betting it won’t take long before Glade, Airwick and Febreeze are all over this!

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