Josh Martin

Excuse Me, I Need To Check My Smartphone!
Excuse Me, I Need To Check My Smartphone!

Have you checked your smartphone today? Chances are you have…..A LOT! New data shows that the average person checks their phone around 110 times a day! Can you say we are addicted. They defined “checking” the phone as activating the screen by pressing the home or power button, or unlocking the device. Users tend to be most active between 5 PM and 8 PM, but 24-percent use their devices between 3-AM and 5 AM. One participant in the study locked and unlocked their phone as many as 900-times in one day! Yikes, that would make me feel like a slave to technology, but ironically there is also something freeing about having all that information at your fingertips. We always have to be first to scoop up the latest breaking news, don’t we? If you’ll excuse me, I need to see what I missed during the time I was writing this!

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