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Graco recalls nearly 2M car seats

Graco recalls nearly 2M car seats

RECALLED:This undated photo provided by Graco Children’s Products shows a SnugRide Classic Connect infant car seat. Graco Children's Products is recalling 1.9 million infant car seats, bowing to demands from U.S. safety regulators in what is now the largest seat recall in American history. Buckles can get gummed up by food and drinks, and that could make it hard to remove children. Infant-seat models covered by the recall issued Tuesday, July 1, include the SnugRide, SnugRide Classic Connect (including Classic Connect 30 and 35), SnugRide 30, SnugRide 35, SnugRide Click Connect 40, and Aprica A30. They were manufactured between July 2010 and May 2013, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Photo: Associated Press

Graco on Monday announced the recall of 1.9 million child safety seats due to a problems with the buckle and harness.

The company says the buckle, found on a variety of its carseat models, can be “difficult to open.” The company says there have been no injuries reported as a result of the buckle and is offering consumers a free replacement part.

Graco says it is safe to continue using the carseat until a replacement buckle arrives.

The announcement marks the largest seat recall in U.S. history, the Associated Press reported.

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