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Pharrell Williams defends ‘Blurred Lines’ video

Pharrell Williams defends ‘Blurred Lines’ video

Photo: WENN

Pharrell Williams¬†has defended the raunchy video for his hit track “Blurred Lines,” insisting the promo was meant to be high-fashion rather than crude.

The tune, a collaboration between Williams, Robin Thicke, and T.I., was an international hit upon its release last month, but the song’s video caused a storm of controversy as it features a bevy of near-naked beauties dancing seductively.

Officials at a British rape charity claimed the footage objectifies women and the song’s lyrics glamorize sexual violence, but Williams insists it is intended to represent a page from a fashion magazine in motion.

He says, “We were trying to make a moving version of a page in Vogue, where you might see a woman’s breast. The body isn’t meant to be objectified.”

“I know the video has caused some controversy, but my admiration for women supersedes anything I could ever say. We all come through the conduit of the bodies of beautiful women.”

The video was initially pulled from YouTube for violating its nudity terms in March, before being reinstated.

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